BASRaT’s Role

BASRaT has a dual role, one as a membership organisation and the other as a regulatory body for Graduate Sport Rehabilitators (GSRs) in the United Kingdom. Individuals entitled to use the title ‘GSR' (Graduate and Graduate Allied Health Professional categories) are registrants of the organisation and therefore appear on our register. All other categories are members of the organisation.

We have a responsibility to monitor professional standards of our registrants, protect the public and maintain public confidence in the profession. All registrants are required to meet and maintain the BASRaT standards of education, skill and conduct as stated in the BASRaT Standards of Ethical Conduct and Behaviour (SECB) and Role Delineation documents (RD).

What is fitness to practise?

An individual is considered ‘fit to practise’ if they possess the appropriate skills, knowledge, health and character to practise safely and effectively. In addition, this also includes acts and/or behaviour which may affect:

  • Protection of the public,
  • Public confidence in the profession and the regulatory process.

It is important to note that an individual’s health and/or disability will be considered in direct relation to their ability to practise safely and effectively. If the particular condition is stable and managed appropriately then this should not affect a registrant’s ability to practise safely and effectively. Being able to manage a condition appropriately also includes adapting, limiting and stopping practise if required. When BASRaT makes a judgement regarding a registrant’s good character we cannot state that an individual will never behave in an inappropriate way but on the basis of the available evidence, there is no reason to believe that they would not adhere to our professional standards.

When might an individual’s fitness to practise be impaired?

BASRaT uses the term impairment to mean any circumstance which impacts or may impact upon the ability and capability of an individual to undertake safe and effective practice. Impairment can take many forms including transitory or permanent circumstances. BASRaT considers possible circumstances for impairment of fitness to practise on an individual basis. For example, impairment is likely if an individual:

  • Conduct that falls below the BASRaT standards of education, skill and conduct as stated in the BASRaT Standards of Ethical Conduct and Behaviour (SECB) and Role Delineation documents (RD).
  • Has been dishonest, been convicted of fraud or theft or abused someone’s trust.
  • Has covered up mistakes or impeded some form of investigation.
  • Were involved in sexual misconduct (including child pornography).
  • Has a substance abuse or misuse issue.
  • Has exploited a vulnerable person.
  • Failed to respect a client’s rights.
  • Has been violent or exhibited threatening behaviour.
  • Had an inappropriate relationship with a client.
  • Has a health problem which is not appropriately managed and which impacts on their ability to practise safely and effectively.

In the case of the above examples it would be more appropriate for the concern to be investigated via a formal process.

Further information regarding our processes related to raising a concern/fitness to practise can be found on our Feedback/Raising a Concern page and or FtP Membership Guide document.

Health related to fitness to practise

It is important to note that an individual’s health and/or disability will be considered in direct relation to their ability to practise safely and effectively. This means that BASRaT does not require information regarding someone’s health and/or disability unless it affects their ability to practise safely and effectively. If the particular condition is stable and managed appropriately then this should not affect an individual’s application/practise. Being able to manage a condition appropriately also includes adapting, limiting and stopping practise if required.

Character related to fitness to practise

It is important to note that an individual’s ‘good character’ will be considered in direct relation to their ability to practise safely and effectively. Consideration will be given to current and past actions which may suggest that an individual is not of ‘good character’.

'Good character' will be considered in relation to whether the individual has acted, or are likely to act in the future:

  • In a way that puts the health, safety and well-being of clients or members of the public at risk.
  • In a way that would reduce public confidence in the profession.
  • In a way that shows an unwillingness to conduct one’s self in accordance with BASRaT professional standards.
  • In a dishonest way.

Non-exhaustive examples can be found in our Raising a Concern/FtP Guide and FtP Membership Guide documents.

Applicants must also disclose any criminal convictions or cautions at the point of initial registration, and upon renewal each year. Registration with BASRaT is not exempt from the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974, therefore, we only ask applicants to disclose convictions which are not yet spent under the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974. The declaration of a caution or conviction will be considered via the process outlined in our Fitness to Practise guide.

The List below includes all relevant BASRaT guidance and processes related to Fitness to Practise: